ERS-1 SAR backscatter changes associated with ice growing on shallow lakes in Arctic Alaska
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ERS-1 SAR backscatter changes associated with ice growing on shallow lakes in Arctic Alaska

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Published by Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Technical Information Service, distributor in Fairbanks, AK, [Washington, DC, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Backscattering.,
  • ERS-1 (ESA satellite),
  • Lake ice.,
  • Radar imagery.,
  • Radar scattering.,
  • Synthetic aperture radar.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementM.O. Jeffries, H. Wakabayashi and W.F. Weeks.
SeriesNASA contractor report -- NASA CR-199629.
ContributionsWakabayashi, H., Weeks, W. F., United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15419017M

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Spatial and temporal backscatter intensity (sigma(sup o)) variations from ice growing on shallow lakes during winter near Barrow, NW Alaska, have been quantified for the first time using ERS-I C-band SAR data acquired at the Alaska SAR Facility. Changes in ERS 1 C band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter intensity (σ°) from ice growing on shallow tundra lakes at three locations in NW Alaska are described. Ice core analysis shows that at all lakes on the coast at Barrow the ice, whether floating or frozen to the bottom, includes an inclusion‐free layer overlying a layer of ice with tubular bubbles oriented parallel to the direction of Cited by: SAR backscatter from floating lake ice can come from a. variety of sources: snow, “gray” or snow ice on the surface, en-. trapped bubbles, a rough ice/water interface, or double bounce. from. A survey of ice growth and decay processes on a selection of shallow and deep sub-Arctic and Arctic lakes was conducted using radiometrically calibrated ERS-1 SAR images. Time series of radar.

A survey of ice growth and decay processes on a selection of shallow and deep sub-Arctic and Arctic lakes was conducted using radiometrically calibrated ERS-1 SAR images. Time series of radar backscatter data were compiled for selected sites on the lakes during the period ot ice cover (September to June) for the years and RADARSAT Backscatter Characteristics of Ice Growing on Shallow Sub-Arctic Lakes, Churchill, Manitoba, Canada Article (PDF Available) in Hydrological Processes 16(8) - . European remote sensing satellite ERS-1/2 synthetic aper-ture radar (SAR) data and a numerical lake ice model were employed to determine the response of ice cover (thickness, freezing to the bed, and phenology) on shallow lakes of the North Slope of Alaska . 1. Introduction. Shallow lakes are abundant in many regions of the Arctic, primarily due to prior glaciation and degradation of near surface ice-rich permafrost (Duguay et al., ; Grosse et al., ; Smith et al., ).Traditionally, winter lake ice grows to 2 m thick at maximum ice thickness (MIT) and shallow lakes with depths less than MIT freeze completely and are called bedfast Cited by:

Characterization of L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter from floating and grounded thermokarst lake ice in Arctic Alaska M. Engram1, K. W. Anthony 1, F. J. Meyer2, and G. Grosse3 1Water and Environmental Research Center, Institute of Northern Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Tanana Loop, Fairbanks, AK , USACited by:   Winter Sentinel‐1 Backscatter as a Predictor of Spring Arctic Sea Ice Melt Pond Fraction. Abstract. Spring melt pond fraction (f p) has been shown to influence September sea ice extent and, with a growing need to improve melt pond physics in climate and forecast models, observations at large spatial scales are by: 3. Jefferies et al. [27] examined this effect using the European Space Agency Earth Resources Satellite-1 (ERS-1) radar backscatter temporal changes on the freezing of the oriented thaw lakes of the. With the growing amount of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images available for sea ice observation, it is important to generate SAR data products in support of var-ious user applications. These include sea ice research, climate studies, support to navigation in ice, and other operations in ice-covered seas. Studies of sea ice signatures in C.